Kendall Square

44 stories
Biotech-focused Atlas Venture moves into new digs in Tech Square
Atlas Venture partners Peter Barrett and Bruce Booth. (Photo by Scott Kirsner / BetaBoston.)
If you haven't been following the breakup of the 35-year-old venture capital firm Atlas Venture, which once invested in both tech and biotech, partner Peter Barrett sums it up this way: "In this divorce, the life sciences side kept the name, and the tech side got the house." So Atlas's team of tech investors is casting about for a new name, but staying in East Cambridge. And the biotech crew, still known as Atlas, just moved into new offices yesterday atop 400 Technology Square in Cambridge, midway between the Kendall and Central stations on the Red Line. Read More
Kendall Square: A report on who's there
kendall-aerial
Some interesting data from the Kendall Square Association on the composition of that intensely innovative, increasingly expensive neighborhood: The association spent the past 18 months looking at about 770 companies with offices in the Square, and categorizing them by industry sector. Interestingly, biotech and health care companies now represent the biggest single slice. (I touched on this shift in a Globe column last October.) But the research didn't capture every company located within an incubator or a shared office space; the KSA estimates there are about 1,100 businesses in total in the neighborhood. Read More
In the event this winter ends...
Kendall Square may soon get a 'pop-up park'
Aerial view of proposed "pop-up park" on Kendall Street in Cambridge. (Courtesy Glenn KnicKrehm, Constellation Center.)
I wrote last week about the long-delayed Constellation Center project, which aspires to build a $300 million performing arts center in Kendall Square. The project's acre of fenced-off land is basically the front yard of the Genzyme Center and the Watermark East apartment complex, just off Third Street. (See the map below.) Read More
Innovation Economy
A star still waiting to be born in Kendall Square
Halls - Color
If you last visited Kendall Square 10 years ago and returned to the Cambridge neighborhood today, you’d think Jack had sprinkled around a bushel of magic beans. New buildings have sprouted, bars and restaurants have opened, and an East Coast Google campus has been completed. You can even ice skate in the winter or rent a kayak in the summer. But one thing that hasn’t changed is Glenn KnicKrehm’s empty gravel lot in the heart of the square. The precious acre of property is still surrounded by chain-link fence, and KnicKrehm is still spinning his vision of building a $300 million arts and culture complex called the Constellation Center. Read more in my latest Innovation Economy column in The Boston Globe.    
InnerCity Weightlifting to open outpost in Kendall Square
Personal trainers from InnerCity Weightlifting work with employees at Microsoft's New England office. Joanne Rathe/ Globe Staff
In this weekend's Boston Globe Magazine, business columnist Shirley Leung writes about InnerCity Weightlifting, the Dorchester gym that has provided a source of support and job opportunities to formerly incarcerated men by helping them become personal trainers. For the past two years, founder Jon Feinman has been pairing members of the gym with employees at Microsoft's New England headquarters for training sessions. Now he plans to take the idea one step further and open a gym in the heart of the Cambridge tech community. As Leung writes:
Come February or so, his theory will face the ultimate test when he opens a gym in Kendall Square, the playground of computer geniuses, scientists, venture capitalists, and entrepreneurs. It’s an expensive proposition for a nonprofit — a $1.5 million lease over five years, for which InnerCity Weightlifting is still fund-raising. But Feinman, InnerCity’s founder and executive director, feels certain this is exactly where his program needs to be if the goal is to get men on a path out of their dangerous world and into one with possibilities. “We felt it was a greater risk not to make this investment,” says 31-year-old Feinman, who himself worked as a personal trainer and earned an MBA from Babson College before launching InnerCity. ... The concept is so starkly simple you can’t help but wonder if it could succeed. Can we lift people up from the bottom by exposing them to the people at the top?
Read the full story here.  
Play With Your Food
PHOTOS: At Cafe ArtScience, food is the next frontier
Cafe ArtScience
In today's Boston Globe, BetaBoston's Nidhi Subbaraman takes us inside Cafe ArtScience, a new restaurant and gallery space in Kendall Square where guests can revel in a Wonka-like world of food. Together with food writer Michael Floreak, she introduces us to the mind of the restaurant's proprietor, David Edwards:
The next culinary sensation in Boston may not be a Le Cordon Bleu-trained chef, but a Harvard scientist whose high-tech tinkering with food has produced breathable chocolates and pods of frozen yogurt wrapped in an edible skin. Those kinds of fantastical concoctions will join more recognizable plates such as duck confit and poached tuna Nicoise salad at Café ArtScience, a new restaurant in Kendall Square that is the latest product of inventor David Edwards’s frantic imagination. His “drinks” menu includes a Manhattan cocktail infused with cigar essence and Scotch that is ingested in vapor form. “He is an adventurer. He explores places that are not easy to go, and he is not afraid of that,” said Remy Spengler, who helps Edwards run Le Laboratoire in Paris, an art and design salon of sorts that leans heavily on scientific experimentation.
Read more from the Globe here, and see more images of the space below.
Tipping point
Kendall Square passes from tech center to biotech center
Shannon Pendergrast of Ymir Genomics isolates exosomes from biofluids at LabCentral in Cambridge’s Kendall Square. (Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff)
The three-story brick building at the corner of Main and Osborn streets in Cambridge, on the edge of Kendall Square and the MIT campus, captures three distinct eras in the city’s innovation history. In the early 1800s, it was the site of Kimball & Davenport, the first builder of passenger railroad cars in America. Read More
Happy Coffee Day!
Home to revolutionaries and innovators, Beantown has a long history with coffee
Photo via The Boston Globe
Coffee has powered all kinds of change-makers in Boston. In 1676 a man named John Sparry got authorization to open the first coffee shop in the New World. In the 1700s, activists nursed plans for revolution in the Green Dragon, a coffee shop in Boston's North End. Today, cafes lining the streets of the Seaport and Kendall Square host innovators plotting a different kind of change. Read More