Harvard Business School

12 stories
Venture
Venture capital's diversity problem isn't just bad PR — it's bad for business
Ellen Pao, Therese Lawless, Alan Exelrod
Legendary venture capital firm Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers was cleared of any wrongdoing in last week’s sensational trial alleging gender discrimination against Ellen Pao, a former member of the firm. But there’s no question that the venture capital world suffers from a lack of diversity — a situation that persists even though researchers at the country’s top business schools have shown it’s bad for business, which should be the bottom line for any investor. Read More
Not your average nerds
HourlyNerd gets $7.8 million in new funding from powerhouse group of investors
HourlyNerd co-founders (left to right) Peter Maglathlin, Pat Petitti, and Rob Biederman (Photo via HourlyNerd)
HourlyNerd, the Boston-based online consulting service company, is not shy about its aspirations. After announcing today that it has received $7.8 million in new funding, co-founder Rob Biederman was quite bullish on the company's prospects. "What we are trying to do with our technology product is far from trivial," Biederman explained. "For 90 years, McKinsey [well-known consulting firm McKinsey & Company] has done what we are doing with extremely talented, intelligent people with 30 or 4o years of experience. And we are trying to do that with a piece of technology." Read More
Meet the lone Super Bowl veteran who works in Boston's startup scene
Seattle Seahawks linebackers Lofa Tatupu and Isaiah Kacyvenski warm up before Super Bowl XL in 2006. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
I caught up with Isaiah Kacyvenski Thursday evening just after he'd arrived in Phoenix for this Sunday's Super Bowl. Kacyvenski told me he'd put in a pretty full week at the Cambridge-based electronics startup MC10 — interrupted by the blizzard, of course — before heading west. Nine years ago, when he traveled to the Big Game in Detroit, it was as a starting linebacker and special teams captain for the Seattle Seahawks. Kacyvenski, a graduate of Harvard University and Harvard Business School, is the only Super Bowl veteran I've ever met who's part of the Boston startup scene. When he was drafted by the Seahawks in 2000, he became the highest NFL draft pick in Harvard's history, and his career lasted until 2008, when injuries forced him to retire. He's now a business development executive at MC10, which develops flexible electronics. I asked Kacyvenski a few questions before he headed to the NFL Players Association party last night. Read More
Outsource your errands
Startup Alfred raises $2 million for urban butler service
An Alfred errand-runner brings in a customer's shoes for repair. Company-supplied photo.
Uber and Lyft made chauffeured cars accessible to non-Wall Streeters, and sites like Airbnb and Flipkey made it possible to find a sweet deal on a beachfront villa. Now Alfred, a startup born on the campus of Harvard Business School, wants to let you pay for just a fraction of a personal assistant, at $99 a month. And today, the company is announcing its first funding round: $2 million, supplied by Boston-based Spark Capital and SV Angel of San Francisco. Read More
Winner, Winner
TechCrunch Disrupt has a very Boston flavor this year
Marcela Sapone delivered a winning pitch for Alfred at Harvard Business School's New Venture Competition.
So TechCrunch's annual Disrupt conference is either still the premier national tech conference or a shell of its former greatness, depending on whom you listen to. Featured prominently in HBO's show Silicon Valley this year, one thing is undeniable about TechCrunch Disrupt: it is still a kingmaker of sorts. Read More
Spotting a rocket
Harvard startup SpotRocket shows how Boston's hot tech firms rate nationally
The SpotRocket team. Top row (left to right): Cherian Kurien, Tim Chaves, Duncan Kauffman, Ross Porter.
Bottom row (left to right): Payal Agrawal Divakaran, Hann Yew. (Courtesy of company)
Gauging how well a startup is doing is a challenge for anyone — even investors get it wrong all the time. So you can imagine how tough it might be for a student just getting out of college and considering a job at a startup. A new startup from Harvard Business School students, SpotRocket, is working to make things a bit more transparent. Read More
Sports and Twitter
NFL stars come to Harvard to talk social media presence and 'social capital'
Richard Sherman, Domonique Foxworth, Larry Fitzgerald, and Arian Foster at Harvard's iLab
On Wednesday afternoon, the Harvard Innovation Lab — usually home to talks by movers and shakers in the business and entrepreneurship worlds — hosted four world-class athletes for a discussion about the business of sports and how athletes navigate the worlds of social media. The panel, "Social Capital of the Savvy Athlete," featured Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks firebrand Richard Sherman, Arizona Cardinal All-Pro Larry Fitzgerald, Houston Texans star Arian Foster, and former Denver Bronco and current HBS student Domonique Foxworth. It was moderated by Anita Elberse, professor of business administration at Harvard Business School. Read More
Cheering crowd
MC10 brings Andrew Luck, Matt Hasselbeck, and Taylor Twellman to Harvard to talk tech and sports
MC10 num 2

On Thursday afternoon, there was quite a bit of buzz and even a long line of students anxiously waiting outside of the Harvard Innovation Lab, the usually quiet, white monolith that sits on an island at the outskirts of the Harvard Business School campus in Allston.

The reason for the uncharacteristic crowd at the ‘i-lab’ was a panel focused on the crossroads of sports and technology.

While it doesn’t seem like the type of event that would draw a packed house of MBA candidates, the event, hosted by Boston-based wearable sensor company MC10, featured some well known names from the sports world, highlighted by the appearance of former NFL top draft pick and recent Pro-Bowl quarterback Andrew Luck. Read More