Education

20 stories
Early Developer Development
Flatiron School bringing its high school coding program to Boston
Flatiron
Adam Enbar, one of the cofounders of New York City coding program Flatiron School, is no stranger to Boston. The Harvard Business School graduate did stints at HubSpot and CRV (when it was still known as Charles River Ventures) before heading to New York to start, with Avi Flombaum, what has become one of the model programming schools in the country. Read More
Kids these days
Anything is possible: A look inside Kendall Square's newest makerspace
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The Possible Project, an entrepreneurship program for students, opened a brand new workshop in Cambridge Thursday, just across the road from Technology Square. It’s the latest in a clutch of so-called “makerspaces” that are training middle school and high school students (not to mention adults) in design, building, and business skills. Read More
Cambridge students study science with a CSI-inspired crime lab
Cambridge eighth graders Nellisha Leonce  and Patrina Eugene examined their fingerprints on a brushed plastic cup during a week-long forensics workshop at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge. (Wendy Maeda/Boston Globe)
A little after noon on Wednesday last week, two technicians from the Cambridge Police Department crime lab arrived at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, kits in tow. But the famed center was not the scene of a crime. Rather, it was hosting a four-day vacation science camp for middle-schoolers, and the two crime-lab techs were participating in a session called “Get A Clue” to introduce 22 adolescents to scientific skills such as microscopy and dissections. And to make the session all the more engaging for the kids, the Whitehead and its partner in the program, the educational group Science from Scientists, had cooked up a whodunit: the theft of a candy recipe they would solve using technical sleuthing taught by real-life CSI types. Read More
international ed tech
Boston ed-tech firm Cengage Learning announces the expansion of LearnLaunch to Latin America
cengage
Boston will soon have a new partner in education innovation: some 600 million people from the tip of South America to the United States border. Cengage Learning, an international educational services company, announced Thursday that it will back the expansion of Boston-based LearnLaunch Accelerator to Latin America at Cengage's innovation lab at the University of Chihuahua in Mexico. Read More
Kickstart this
The miniPCR brings DNA testing to the masses
After a successful Kickstarter campaign, the miniPCR will now be available for classrooms Photo: via Ampylus
When Sebastian Kraves and Ezequiel "Zeke" Alvarez-Saavedra were growing up in Argentina, the science labs in their high school classrooms had only the most basic equipment. But the tools at their disposal were enough to spark an interest in biology that eventually led them both to Boston: Kraves received his doctorate in neurobiology from Harvard, while Alvarez-Saavedra took home a PhD in biology from MIT. Read More
Get Wicked Smaht!
President Obama kicks off Computer Science Education Week
In New York City in August, women coded for women's health. (Photo: SELF Magazine)
This morning, President Obama kicked off Computer Science Education Week by pushing Code.org's "Hour of Code" initiative with a pump up speech urging more people to get involved in learning to code. As the president said, "Don't just consume things, create things. Take an hour to learn about the technology that touches every part of our lives." Read More
Permission Slips? We don't need no stinking Permission Slips
Techstars' EdTrips is more than your average back-to-school startup
Image via iStock
EdTrips is a startup that has found a way to make signing up and paying for field trips much easier for teachers, students, and especially parents. Since paper field trip permission slips and payments have a habit of getting lost in your kid's backpack, EdTrips is a great concept to start with. Read More
Boston's biggest businesses
In education and health care, the future is about cost and access
Image licensed from Shutterstock
The future is not up and to the right. Yet if you look at two of Massachusetts’ biggest industries — health care and education — that’s the trajectory. Better quality, high pay, strong reputations, expensive new facilities, and breakthrough innovations mean you can charge more, more, more. Read More