video

11 stories

Some big investors are betting that our appetite for online video will be worth a pretty penny. They’ve ponied up $58 million to launch a video service called Vessel, for which fans will pay $3 a month to get first looks at exciting short videos. Vessel will show the same stuff that will eventually appear on YouTube or other short video sites, but three days sooner.More →

If you’ve ever carried a tub of Ping-Pong balls near some sort of slope or ledge, then you’ve felt it: an overwhelming urge to dump the balls out and watch how they bounce.

Well, HubSpot decided to give in to that urge, and in a spectacular manner. Fresh off its first-quarter earnings call yesterday — in which the company reported revenue of $38.2 million, a 58 percent uptick from last year — HubSpot dumped 15,000 Ping-Pong balls off of a fourth-floor balcony in its building to celebrate its 15,000th customer.

Poor, poor custodians.More →

Don’t fear the pivot, says Pixability chief executive Bettina Hein.

When she started the company in 2008, in the thick of the recession, the mission was to help small businesses make marketing videos cheaply. Pixability would even mail out a Flip video camera — remember those? — that business owners could shoot with. Pixability would edit the footage, adding logos, titles, and a soundtrack.More →

If you remember the way video was handled on the Internet a decade ago, it was a pretty sloppy situation. Netflix was still two years away from launching its streaming service, and Apple hadn’t yet introduced video to its iTunes online store. To watch something, you often had to download special video player software, or sit and wait while a QuickTime movie downloaded. And if you wanted to upload video of your own, you had to navigate a sea of different formats — and restrictions on file size.

When I wrote a story for the New York Times in October 2005 about the various companies that wanted to make it simpler to share and view video online, it was tough to tell who was going to win. One of the entrepreneurs I interviewed was Chad Hurley, who co-founded YouTube. (It launched ten years ago this month.)More →

I’m not a big buyer of dangly earrings or silver-and-turquoise cuffs, but I have to admit: the new video “house party” software from Kitsy Lane, a Boston-based e-commerce startup, is a lot of fun. Instead of lining up a babysitter and visiting a friend’s house to nibble cheese and crackers and try on costume jewelry, you sign on for a group videochat. The new vParty software is part of a recently-launched site from Kitsy Lane called Chelsea Row that focuses on selling jewelry and accessories online, through in-person “trunk shows” and the new live video events.More →

I’ve watched this video a few times, and it still blows my mind: Using high-speed video of nearby items, such as a plant or stray chip wrapper, MIT, Microsoft, and Adobe researchers found a way to analyze vibrations and algorithmically recreate roughly what sounds were in the room, down to actual words being spoken or a tune being played — without any recorded audio cues.More →