Transportation

47 stories

The city of Cambridge is proposing to let car-sharing services park their vehicles in the largest residential driveways in the hopes of decreasing car ownership and consequently reducing the city’s notorious parking competition. The proposed ordinance would open the door for homeowners to allow companies such as ZipCar or AVIS to park their short-term rental cars in their driveways, but only if they have four or more parking spots.More →

Jason Heard got to Fenway Park at noon for Monday’s Red Sox home opener, but he wasn’t there to watch the game. Instead, Heard was working for a parking lot tucked behind the ballpark, waving cars into an alley with a bright orange flag.

Fifty dollars per carload for the prime spots. If that seems steep, the market didn’t think so — an hour and a half before the first pitch, Heard was using his flag to tell people there were no more spots to be had.More →

Boston’s parking meters are going to get a lot smarter over the next few years, eventually letting drivers find open spots and feed the meter with their smartphones.

The citywide upgrade could also let the city get a better handle on how much street parking it actually controls, and even raise more money for the government by charging higher prices at times of extreme demand.More →

This morning, Boston-based Bridj, a transportation startup that aims to bring better, user-informed bus services to metropolitan areas, announced that it plans to expand its operations to Washington, D.C., this spring.

Bridj initially started testing potential bus routes in Boston last June, and released its long-awaited mobile application in January. This most recent step is helping the company to get closer to its original vision of a data-driven transit service that meets the demands of citizens in neighborhoods lacking reliable public transportation. The service saw an influx in popularity in the wake of the recent snowstorms, particularly during some of the worst MBTA and traffic woes.More →