Privacy

23 stories

Despite the fact that the majority of Americans have not taken any concrete steps to protect their privacy in this post-Snowden era, the Pew Research Center has found that the vast majority of Americans do care about their privacy and who has access to their information.

Ninety-three percent of Americans report that being in control of who can access their information is somewhat or very important to them. In addition, 90 percent say that what information is accessed, not just who can access that information, is important to them as well.More →

If you’ve ever said, “markets are conversations” you’re quoting the words of The Cluetrain Manifesto, the ’90s-era opus on the promise of the Web. David Weinberger and Doc Searls (two of the original authors of Cluetrain) are publishing another provocative work today called New Clues. I caught up with them this week to hear about the project. None of us wants to be clueless, so go ahead, check it out; here’s the link to their page: New Clues.More →

It’s been about 17 months since Edward Snowden leaked details about the National Security Agency’s tracking practices, information that triggered a firestorm of investigations into the US government’s access to private data and the way technology companies secured and shared consumer information.

On Tuesday, Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith spoke at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, facing an audience that included some of the loudest critics of the NSA’s activities in the US.More →

If you’ve read danah boyd’s new book, “It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens” you’ll understand just how complicated online privacy, identity, and the use of real names on Facebook can be. Boyd is a Research Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU, a Fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and also a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research.

Boyd is in Boston this week to deliver a keynote address at the Marketing Profs B2B Conference in Copley Square. I caught up with her and asked her a few questions about her new book and other issues surrounding online privacy.More →

Two weeks ago, Facebook began suspending the accounts of members of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, a drag and community service organization. Members who’d been active on Facebook under their stage names were locked out until they registered with their legal names.

For those members who wanted to keep their stage identities separate from the rest of their lives, at least online, Facebook’s actions threatened to tear down a critical wall of privacy. After attempted discussions with Facebook, a whole lot of media (and social media) attention, and a Change.org campaign that’s collected more than 36,300 signatures, on Wednesday Facebook’s chief product officer Chris Cox apologized to the group.More →

Apple showed off its Apple Watch today and demonstrated how it’s also a sophisticated fitness and health tracker that measures your heart rate, various activity levels, and syncs with your phone.

Apple, the company that once held your photos and emails and contacts, can now collect a whole other kind of additional private data that’s even closer to your skin—heart rate, movement patterns, sleeping patterns, and more.

They also have a unique opportunity to use that very same information for security. But will they take it?More →

Personal data about customers is increasingly valuable to businesses, and casinos are among the most voracious data gatherers of them all. But unlike others, the gambling industry goes the extra mile to reward patrons for sharing their personal information. That’s one surprising lesson from “What Stays in Vegas,” a new book about how businesses everywhere—and the gambling and entertainment industry in particular—collect and use data about their customers. More →