Neuroscience

9 stories

There are staff shifts afoot at Nara Logics, the Cambridge artificial intelligence company that is helping businesses better understand their customers.

Jana Eggers, the Lycos and Intuit veteran who joined the company as president in September, has replaced co-founder Tom Copeman as chief executive. Neuroscientist and Princeton professor Sebastian Seung, who is something of rockstar for his work on the wiring of the human brain, has also joined company’s advisory board.More →

Boston device-maker Thync has been steadily gathering attention for its far-out claim that its next-gen gadget, a wireless wearable electrode for your brain, can tune your mood. It comes in two settings, “Calm” or “Energize,” and Thync claims their device can amp up your alertness like a shot of caffeine, or mellow you out like a good massage — all with a precisely designed pulse of current.

By and large, according to reports from the tech media and various tech and health professionals who’ve tried the device, it seems the company is delivering on its promise (I tried it myself and felt significantly blissed-out afterward). But for the first time, Thync has published a study that explains some of the magic behind their mad idea. And while it’s still pending peer review, it does provide an appetizer of experimental evidence that their device, so far trialed by an army of some 3,000 test subjects, actually works.More →

Veritas Scientific Corporation is — well, it must be — the rare company with technology that surpasses the limitations of what scientists understand.

Veritas is all about deception. In the promotional video here, Veritas Scientific’s founder and CEO Eric Fenn Elbot says that he “started reading incredible research about how to detect brain waves to detect deception, and how to use brain waves to go beyond that, to even, perhaps, be able to identify friend from foe.” Therefore, he went into business.More →

With hundreds of lives riding on every decision, the job of air traffic controller ranks near the top of almost any list of the world’s most stressful jobs. The stakes are so high that the Federal Aviation Administration has increased staffing and rest requirements in recent years to help keep controllers alert in the tower.More →