13 stories

Localytics, the Boston-based app analytics and marketing company, turned heads last month when it raised $35 million in a Series D round. The influx of cash — it’s raised $58 million in total — made Localytics the most well-funded startup to come out of the competitive Techstars accelerator program.

Today, it’s become clearer what that money could be going toward: the company announced the acquisition of Splitforce, a three-year-old startup that helps companies test their apps, for an undisclosed sum.More →

Boston is both the capital of American higher education and one of the country’s top centers for technology entrepreneurship. So it makes sense that entrepreneurs here would be interested in rethinking the big business of college.

Today, two of those companies are joining forces. Valore, a nine-year-old Boston company that runs online marketplace sites for textbooks and student loans, is acquiring online learning startup Boundless, which provides digital alternatives to textbooks.More →

You never know which meeting is going to lead to something worthwhile…

Dave Balter, founder and CEO of the online skills testing site Smarterer, was at an edtech conference in Phoenix in April. Balter had about three dozen meetings scheduled over the course of the event, but other people at the conference kept telling him he should meet the CEO of Utah-based Pluralsight, which serves up online training in the tech and creative industries. Balter sent him a quick e-mail “and we squeezed in ten minutes before everyone went to the airport,” he says. A few months later, Pluralsight CEO Aaron Skonnard flew to Boston “and we began active merger discussions,” Balter says.More →

LogMeIn is staying mum on one of its most recent acquisitions. In September, the Boston-based software-as-a-service company paid $15 million for Meldium, which makes it simpler to sign on to web-based services. But it paid $6 million for another San Francisco startup, according to its latest quarterly report. It only describes this second acquisition, which also took place in early September, as involving a “collaboration software provider.”More →

Up until nine months ago, Google had acquired just four companies in the Boston area (or five, if you count the company’s “acquisition” of Biz Stone/Genius Labs). One of those was the huge pickup of ITA Software, of course, but little else apparently enthralled Google in Boston during the company’s first decade-and-a-half.

More →