Accelerators

30 stories

For the first time, the Techstars Boston accelerator program for startups will wrap up with two separate showcases next week. On Monday, about 100 venture capitalists and individual angel investors who have put money into Techstars companies in the past — or have supported the program in other ways — will get a first glimpse at this year’s cohort. Then on Tuesday, the startups will present to a larger crowd at the Back Bay Event Center.More →

Recruiting trips around Europe over the winter by the head of the Techstars Boston entrepreneurship program have resulted in a geographically diverse new group of participating companies. Two hail from Canada, two from Ukraine, one from Spain, and one from Portugal. The remaining half-dozen startups that will hone their products and their pitches during the three-month program come from the Boston area.More →

Earlier this year, Highland Capital announced that it would also partner with a pair of MIT PhD students to launch a pilot accelerator in its Cambridge office. Part of the interest in creating Cybersecurity Factory was to help founders overcome the myriad challenges they often face as they try to get off cybersecurity companies off the ground — from making cybersecurity interesting to investors to actually proving that their actually programs work. More →

A new project aimed at bringing entrepreneurs and creative workers to Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood is getting a boost this weekend.

On Saturday, organizers of the Fairmount Innovation Lab are officially opening the doors of the co-working office and startup accelerator program. The Innovation Lab will also reveal the 10 entrepreneurial teams chosen as the first class of its accelerator program.More →

My latest Boston Globe column looks back at the impact of two initiatives born in Cambridge in 2005: Web Innovators Group and Y Combinator. I also ask what we can do to improve Boston’s stickiness for consumer-oriented Web and mobile startups; it’s impossible to look at the alumni of both programs and not notice that may of the most successful, like Reddit, Dropbox, Birchbox, and E la Carte, have migrated to New York or the Bay Area.More →

Shelfie is not only an au courant name for an app, but a cool concept for these next few weeks of retail frenzy. Once you have the Android or iPhone apps, whenever there’s a product you’re hunting for that’s out-of-stock, you use it to snap a picture of the empty shelf. The info about what’s not there will be valuable to both retailers and product manufacturers, Shelfie posits. The shopper’s reward? Points that can be converted into gift cards for use at places like Starbucks, Amazon, or Target.More →

HOLYOKE — Like Dorothy stepping through the front door after crash-landing in Oz, I knew I wasn’t in Boston anymore.

Boston’s Innovation District is pricey. Construction cranes are everywhere, parking is scarce, and lunch options plentiful. Here in Holyoke’s newly-christened Innovation District, there are beautiful brick mill buildings, cheap hydroelectric power, and a new walkway alongside the canals — but almost no people.

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Betaspring is taking a breather.

The Providence-based accelerator graduated its most recent class of seven startups in June, but doesn’t plan to start a new cycle until next spring. Between now and then, they’ll need to raise a new pool of capital, and Betaspring managing partner Allan Tear tells me that he’s not expecting to get any support from public sources, which have provided substantial backing for Betaspring in the past.More →