Mobile health app Wellframe raises $8.5 million led by DFJ

wellframe

Five months after announcing its seed funding, Boston startup Wellframe said it has raised an $8.5 million Series A round to expand its mobile software, which helps patients stay on a recovery path after returning home from the hospital.

The software provides personalized care plans for patients using technologies including artificial intelligence, and aims to keep patients in close contact with their clinicians.

The new funding was led by DFJ, a prominent Silicon Valley venture firm that’s previously backed the likes of Twitter, Box, SpaceX, and Tesla Motors. Also taking part in the round was Formation 8, Waterline Ventures, and Queensbridge Venture Partners. Investors in the startup’s $1.5 million seed round in April included athenahealth chief executive Jonathan Bush and Tim Draper of DFJ.

Nick Cox offered a good synopsis of Wellframe’s offering at the time of the seed funding:

Wellframe is a bit like the GPS navigation system in your car, said CEO Jacob Sattelmair: Instead of the static laundry-list of care instructions that patients have historically received upon discharge, Wellframe provides “iterative, turn-by-turn guidance.” That guidance comes in the form of “a daily to-do list, which is dynamic and adaptive and meant to personalize what that patient needs to do each day in order to manage their health.”

Depending on the patient’s specific needs, the to-do list might include reminders about taking medication, getting exercise, eating or avoiding certain foods, or calling the hospital. On the other end, Wellframe provides clinicians with a dashboard showing them whether or not patients are on schedule.

Wellframe recently completed a pilot among patients enrolled in cardiac rehab at South Shore Hospital, and plans to announce commercial partnerships in coming months.

Founded in 2011, the company employs 20 and is based on Atlantic Avenue in Boston’s Leather District.

Kyle Alspach has worked in journalism in Massachusetts since 2005 and was one of the original staff writers at BetaBoston.
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