Nidhi Subbaraman

Senior staff writer
Nidhi Subbaraman is a senior staff writer at BetaBoston, reporting on science, research, technology, and any combination of those. Before this, Subbaraman covered science and tech at NBCNews.com. Her work has also appeared online at MIT Technology Review, Fast Company, New Scientist, Nature News, and others. She hearts robots.

Articles By Nidhi Subbaraman

Two years in, the team behind the ClinVar database has published a progress report New England Journal of Medicine. They argue that the shared approach is working — doctors and researchers are using the database — and they are advocating for more companies and groups to join the effort to reach a more comprehensive understanding of the variants in disease genes. In particular, they’re challenging companies to be more open with their data, instead of keeping it to themselves.More →

Panos Panay, chief of the school’s year-old Institute for Creative Entrepreneurship, sought out PureTech’s Sync Project after he heard its founders introduce their idea at SXSW this past March. Sync’s goal is to bring together neuroscientists who study music and the mind, and companies that track biometric data like heart-rate and body temperature. Together, the team would have unique, data-rich insights into how Beyonce’s latest track influences your heart rate, for example, or how Taylor Swift’s new album could shift your blood pressure.More →

When a cold front moved into Somerville the middle of last week, the team at Understory sat by their computer screens, watching it engulf the city in real time. As part of a new partnership with the city, the weather tracking company is looking at Somerville as a giant lab to stress-test its novel design for a local weather monitor.

Just a year ago, Understory raised $1.9 million in funding, changed its name, and moved from Madison, Wis., to Boston to join the Bolt hardware accelerator. It is currently based at the Somerville incubator Greentown Labs, and so this project provides the company with an opportunity to tinker with its new technology in its backyard. For the city, it’s a first shot at gathering high-density weather data that it can put to use during events like snowstorms.More →

Doyle will be taking over the role from Harry Lewis, dean and computer science professor, who was filling the role after Dean Cherry Murray, a physicist who served as dean of the school for five years, announced her intention to step down in October last year. 

At UCSB, Doyle led a biomedical engineering lab whose major projects included an artificial pancreas to treat pediatric diabetes.More →