Cal Borchers

Boston Globe Staff
borchers
Borchers covers the intersection of business and government and the business of sports for the Boston Globe. Previously he was editor of Citizen’s News in Naugatuck, Conn. and a political correspondent for the Globe. He holds a master’s degree in journalism from Northeastern University.

Articles By Cal Borchers

The Boston College business majors who graduated Monday were high school seniors in December 2009 when WePay, the popular payments API company founded by BC alums, raised $1.7 million in a series A venture round. The startup’s continued success — contracts with big-name firms like Care.com and GoFundMe, plus another $32.5 million in funding — is a good reason why members of this year’s class will likely be more entrepreneurial than their predecessors.More →

If I ever suspend my sanity long enough to enter a Warrior Dash, there’s one thing I will absolutely need: a photo of my mud-caked self in action, to show everyone I know just how badass I am.

Now, I can get one for free — a professional one, not a smartphone one — thanks to a Boston startup called Gameface Media, which just signed a deal with the obstacle course series.More →

Most people kill a mosquito with a violent swat of the hand, but Yaroslav Tenzer is much more methodical — and tender. He needs the tiny pest’s body intact so he can harvest its salivary glands.

Mosquito saliva is the key to a potential malaria vaccine and Tenzer, a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard University’s Biorobotics Laboratory, has spent the last two years designing a machine that can very precisely behead an infected mosquito and gently squeeze its body to extract and collect its parasite-filled spit.

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There’s a good chance I just saw the next hot startup.

Harvard Business School crowned the winners of its student New Venture Competition Tuesday night, awarding a total of $150,000 in prize money to four teams. You’ve probably never heard of Alfred, Saathi, Booya Fitness, or TomatoJos, but you’d be wise to learn the names. People weren’t familiar with Redbeacon, Potentia Pharmaceuticals, or NewLeaf Symbiotics before they were winners, either.More →

When New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski missed the first six games of last season because of a forearm injury, what kept him off the field was not the broken bone he suffered months earlier but rather a persistent infection where he received a metal plate to help repair his arm.

Tom Webster, a chemical engineer at Northeastern University, believes Gronkowski might have avoided infection and returned to action faster if the plate had been made of a new kind of material in development at his nanomedicine laboratory.

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